Ascorbitol

Product Overview

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is crucial to both plant and animal life. Humans cannot produce their own ascorbic acid and therefore must supplement through other means. However, while supplementation with ascorbic acid contributes greatly to the quality of human life [15,16,17], what nature offers is much more than simple ascorbic acid.

There are many naturally occurring forms of ascorbic acid [18,19,20]. Different forms of ascorbic acid have unique activities, synergies, and benefits [21,22]. Simple fruits and vegetables actually contain complex varieties of Vitamin C and their synergistic partners [23-25].

By combining the unique benefits of six Vitamin C forms with natural Vitamin C enhancers, bioflavonoids, Dietary Indoles, antioxidants, and more, Ascorbitol embodies the comprehensive balance of nature.

Dietary Benefit

Ingredients in Ascorbitol are shown to reduce the risk of free radical damage, optimize healthy immune function [1,2,3,7], support the cardiovascular system by enhancing blood flow [5,6,8], promote cellular metabolism and proper hormone balance [8,9].

Dosage

Adults take 500-1500 mg 3 times daily. Children take 500 mg up to 3 times daily.

Stability

Ascorbitol is stable for at least three years under normal storage conditions.

Classification

Comprehensive Vitamin C supplement with Dietary Indoles

Regulatory Status

Ascorbitol is a dietary supplement under provisions of US Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA).

Warning

Reduce intake or discontinue use if you experience acid upset or diarrhea.

References

1. Tolbert B.M., 1985 Int. J. Vitam. Nutr. Res.; 27: 122-138.
2. Levine M., 1986 N. Engl. J. Med.; 314: 891-901.
3. Burns J.J. et al. 1987 Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci; 489: 1-538.
4. Niki E., 1990 World Rev. Nutr. Diet; 64: 1-30.
5. Cerda J.J., et al. 1988 Clinical Cardiology; 11: 589-594.
6. Cerda J.J., 1987 Transaction of the American Clinical Climatology Association; 99: 203-213.
7. Middleton E., 1984 Trends in Pharmacological Science; 5: 335.
8. Berdal P., Fr. Demande FR. 2: 583, 560.
9. Michnovicz, J. J.; Bradlow, H. L. 1991 Nutr. Cancer, 16, 59-66 Michnovicz, J. J.; Bradlow, H. L. 1990 Natl. Can. Inst., 82, 947-949
10. Kuhau J., 1976 World Review of Nutrition Dietetics; 24: 117.
11. OíNeill T.M., Mansfield J.W., 1982 Trans. Br. Mycol. Soc;
79: 229-237.
12. Matsubara Y., et at. 1987 Kinki Daigaku Igaku Zasshi;
12: (Supl. 4), 89-101.
13. Gabor M., 1979 Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology; 696.
14. Ishida H. et al., 1988 Takou Kosuge Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin; 36: 4414.
15. Cameron E., Pauling L., 1979 Cancer Research; 5: 6.
16. White L.A., et al. 1986 Journal of Clinical Microbiology;
24: 527-531.
17. Anderson R., 1984 Advances in Nutrition Research; 6: 19-45.
18. (16) Rose R.C., 1987 Biochemica at Biophysica Acta; 924, 254 256.
19. Budavari S. Ed.; Merck & Co., 1989 Merk Index; 11th edition: 809.
20. Guha B.C., Sen-Gupta P.N., 1938 Nature; 141, 974.
21. Eugene S. et al. 1987 Biochemica at Biophysica Acta; 902: 133 136.
22. Bianchi J., Rose R.C., 1986 Proceedings of the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine; 181: 333-337.

Notes

* Additional references are available upon request.